Norea

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In Gnosticism, Norea was a wife of Noah and a daughter of Adam and Eve, although some scholars suggest that Norea might be based on Lamech's daughter Naamah.[1][2]

The Hypostasis of the Archons[edit]

According to the Gnostic text The Hypostasis of the Archons, Eve gave birth to Norea sometime after Seth's birth, and Eve claimed that God gave her Norea in order to assist "many generations" of humankind.

Norea lived into the time of Noah. The archons sought to destroy humankind with a flood, and the Demiurge told to build an ark. However, the Demiurge excluded Noah's wife from the list of persons Noah is permitted to allow on the ark, and Noah did not allow Norea to board the Ark. Although Norea is not explicitly stated to be Noah's wife in The Hypostasis of the Archons, some scholars suggest that the Demiurge's exclusion of Noah's wife from the list of persons permitted to aboard the Arks means that Norea was Noah's wife,[3] and Norea (Nuraita) is depicted as Noah's wife in Mandaeanism.[2][4] After being refused entry, Norea ignited the Ark with her breath. Noah then rebuilt the Ark.

The archons sought to seduce Norea, claiming that they raped Zoe / Eve, but Norea told them that they did not rape the real Zoe. The archons demanded that Norea allow them to rape her, and Zoe called for God to help her.

God then sent His angel Eleleth to Norea, and the archons fled. Eleleth then explained Gnostic cosmology to Norea.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. Pearson, Birger A. (2000). "Revisiting Norea". In King, Karen L. (ed.). Images of the Feminine in Gnosticism. Harrisburg, Pennsylvania: First Trinity Press International. pp. 265–267. ISBN 1-56338-331-4.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Pearson, Birger A. (2006). Gnosticism, Judaism, and Egyptian Christianity. Minneapolis, Minnesota: Fortress Press. p. 92. ISBN 0-8006-3741-0.
  3. Gilhus, Ingvild Saelid (1985). Heissig, Walther; Klimkeit, Hans-Joachim (eds.). The Nature of the Archons. Wiesbaden: Otto Harrassowitz. p. 83. ISBN 3-447-02518-2.
  4. Pearson, Birger A. (2006). Gnosticism, Judaism, and Egyptian Christianity. Minneapolis, Minnesota: Fortress Press. p. 86. ISBN 0-8006-3741-0.